A Timeline Of Golf Technology

January 29th, 2015

Past, present, and what to expect in the future

robotgolfball

Try to think of something that hasn’t been influenced by technology. Come on! I’m waiting….

Yeah, I can’t either. No matter if it’s a sport, connecting with long lost relatives, mapping out a road trip, or even the act of reading a book, technology has touched the process somehow. Whether it’s helped or hindered it, that’s up to you to decide.

Yes, yes. You know where I’m going with this. Golf. The game has been strongly influenced by technology as well. Even the way we watch golf has changed. We can simultaneously watch one guy tee off at the 13th hole, while another guy makes a putt for birdie at the second. We can watch replays and slow-motion and pause to criticize someone’s swing.

The early years of golf didn’t see much technological evolution, but once the innovation ball started rolling, it seemed like there was a new invention every other year.

Technology has affected the way a golf club or golf ball is made. Nowadays, the best engineers in the world are coming up with new inventions to enhance the game in every way possible.

Golf Clubs

classicclubs

When golf was first played, as long as a club could swing, it was considered good enough. Initially clubs were formed from wood, hence the reason we call our drivers a “wood”.

It was in the mid-1960s when Ping released their Anser putter. It was brand new technology at the time with a center of gravity below the center of the ball. The putter also had heel-and-toe weighting to equally distribute the force of the putt. A few years later, Ping introduced a Color Coding System that defined the angle the club lies. It was then that golfers realized that different irons with different angles could be used to enhance your swing.

During the next decade or so, club makers toyed around with different angles and improved upon what was already on the market. The early 1990s brought us the Callaway Big Bertha. The first-of-its-kind driver had a unique shape made of stainless steel with a tip that extended through the club. The change in material was nothing compared to the change in design. Prior to Bertha, club heads were much smaller.

Since the early ‘90s, Bertha has evolved several more times, and so have golf clubs in general. Technology has touched every part of the club from tip to handle — to cell phone?

Yep, in 2011, Ping came out with an App to “improve the consistency” of your putt. It measures your arc, tempo, impact angle, and lie angle.

Golf Balls

classicgolfballs

The very first golf balls were made from wood, and then morphed into leather stuffed with feathers. Back then, golfers were hitting the leather balls with pieces of hand-carved wood, so as long as the ball went forward, I guess that would be considered a win.

In the mid 1800s, the “Gutty” ball was created from dried sap that had a rubber-like feel to it. Because the leather and feather balls were so tough to make, and the Gutty balls simplified the process, golf became a game that was open to the masses.

Just before the turn of the century, rubber core balls replaced the Gutty balls. It was around this time that dimples were starting to be used to improve airflow.

It’s no doubt that technology has impacted the golf ball industry. Throughout the years, the importance of weight, size, symmetry, velocity, roll of the ball, and other aspects have all been studied and improved upon.

Golf Shoes

Like every other aspect of the game, golf shoes have revolutionized, too. Initially regular shoes were worn, but around the mid-1850s, spikes started becoming popular in order to walk safely on wet ground. These do-it-yourself golf shoes were more or less loafers lined with nails. Around 1900, manufacturers began making shoes with screw-in spikes specifically for playing golf.

A few years later, Spalding created the “saddle oxfords” that were meant for tennis and other racket sports. The shoe missed the mark in its original market, but became a hit in the golfing world and became the foundation for all golf shoes for years to come.

The “saddle oxfords” were stiff, and it wasn’t until the 1980s that we saw the turn towards more flexible shoes. Plastic spikes started replacing metal cleats a few years later, with hopes that it would cause less damage to the turf. It was fairly recently that the “spikeless trend” started taking off.

Of course, Nike revolutionized the golf shoe when Tiger Woods started wearing their designs. In the same way Air Jordan’s took over the basketball world, Nike made golf shoes “cool” and much more performance based.

Other Technology For Golfers

Nowadays, wearable technology is all the rage and it hasn’t missed the golf world. There are headbands that can monitor your stress levels as you play. Sensors you can wear in your glove that record tempo and swing path. There is a watch with GPS on it. A sensor clip that can connect to your cell phone or tablet to record any metric you can think of.

It’s pretty crazy to think about how far technology has come and where it might go. Will the sport move from the course and into a simulation booth? Will we see flying cars on the golf course anytime soon? Doubt it. As much as technology might continue to impact the game, if there’s one thing I know about golfers it’s that nothing can top getting out there, smelling the grass, and walking that course.

But I still want a hoverboard.

Don’t Miss Your Chance To Win A FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!

January 26th, 2015

 

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There’s only a few days left to enter my Second January Golf Giveaway for a chance to win a FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!  This prize is valued at over $300 and besides, who doesn’t need a rangefinder! Hurry up Rock Heads – head on over to Facebook to enter Scratch’s January Golf Giveaway!

 

Giveaway!Enter to win via Facebook today! Don’t delay – the contest ends at 11:59 pm EST on January 16th!

  • The sweepstakes runs from January 16th to January 31st at 11:59pm, so you can’t procrastinate in entering to win these fabulous prizes.
  • You must be 18+ years old to enter and win. As much as we appreciate you young pups taking an interest in golf, get your parents to enter if you’re not quite reaching that age requirement.
  • The winner has the option of me
  • All entries will be used and drawing will be random.
  • All you have to do is enter your email address. No purchase necessary! If you are chosen as a winner, the email address you submitted will be used to contact you to obtain an address to send the prize.
  • A Facebook account is needed to enter.
  • The winner will be able to choose whether to receive a right handed, left handed, or ladies’ driver.
  • Only people residin’ in countries that we ship to can apply. International winners will get the value of the prize in caveman cash.

 

The sweepstakes only lasts ’til 11:59pm January 31st, so enter quick for yer chance to win! Enter to win via Facebook today!

 

Now that that’s are out of the way, let’s take a look at our fabulous prize!

 

FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!

The XL1000 is like nothing you’ve seen before from Laser Link Golf. A new design, new features, and new modes add a new dimension to the most complete line of laser rangefinder products in golf. In the hands of the right player, XL1000 is a powerful tool for managing your game.

Features:

  • Accu Flag Mode – Is it the distance to the flagstick or the distance to the trees behind? Accu Flag technology identifies the closest target to help you get your measurement to the flagstick no matter what is behind the green
  • Size: XL1000 is just large enough to use comfortably, and just compact enough for easy storage. And, at less than 8 ounces, those that love to walk will hardly even know it’s there
  • Scan Mode – Scan the landscape to get multiple readings at the touch of a button
  • 6x Magnification
  • IPX4 Waterproof Design – Do you like to play in the rain? Of course you don’t, but if you have to, do it knowing that your XL1000 will be there to help you play your best
  • Range: 5 – 1000 yards. 5 – 300 yards to flag
  • Measures in yards or meters
  • Measures DISTANCE ONLY so as to conform to USGA and R&A Rules of Golf, as well as USGA Handicap Guidelines.
  • Dimensions: 4.125”x 2.875” x 1.5”
  • Weight (with battery): 7.58 oz.
  • Power Source: CR2 3V Lithium
  • Display: Internal LCD

Go to Rock Bottom Golf for more information of the Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!

 

So don’t delay Rock Heads, go Put Your Name In The Hat for a chance to win a FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!

The Best And Wackiest Gear From The 2015 PGA Show!

January 22nd, 2015

Scratch has been hitting the pavement and the grass to bring you all the best coverage of the 2015 PGA Merchandise Show from Orlando, Florida. RBG didn’t travel all that way just to see some mouse. No, we’ve been scoping out the all the newest, coolest gear so we can bring you the best deals in 2015! For all the latest, head on over to the Rock Bottom Golf Facebook page!

Ok first things first, we HAVE to talk about Taylor Made’s newest MiniDrivers! They haven’t been released yet, but the word from Demo Day are that these are some of TM’s longest offerings yet! I personally can’t wait to try one!
Check out these pictures by GolfWRX:

Image from GolfWRX

Image from GolfWRX

 

 

Check out Back 9 Network’s coverage for some of the wackier offerings at the show. Including BACON PANTS!

Scratch was at Demo Day!

 

Golf Digest reported that Golf Pride has changed one of it’s most popular grips. The MCC Plus 4 now has a reduced taper where the lower portion of the grip is larger. Bruce Miller, Sales & Marketing Analyst for Golf Pride stated that, “All our grips on tour were standard,” says Miller. “But tour players were routinely building up the lower portion of the grip. Some 70 percent of players were doing some form of building up using tape. We found the reason was that it helped them not grip the club so tight. So we set out to increase the size of the grip in that area, with the area 4.5 inches to 7 inches down from the butt being the key area.”

I’m sure you all heard about how golf companies want “to grow the game.” That means getting them while they’re young! Rock Bottom found one company at Demo Day that may have found out the perfect way to get the little ones addicted to the game we all love. SNAG Golf uses over-sized clubs to hit fuzzy tennis balls at Velcro covered targets. The closer to the center of the target, the fewer points you get with the objective of getting the lowest score possible! If the stationary targets were too easy, SNAG Golf also thoughtfully provided interns you could hit at!

Check out the coverage from Golf Digest on some of the newest and oddest bags you may start seeing around your local course including the Golf Bike!

Would you use this?

And don’t forget to check out the Rock Bottom Golf Facebook page for more great info and pics from the 2015 PGA Show!

 

Some of the many, many Nike balls you could try at Demo Day!

Some of the many, many Nike balls you could try at Demo Day!

 

The Most Random Golf Facts You’ll Ever Need to Read!

January 22nd, 2015

Have you ever been out on the golf course and pondered to yourself, “Hmm, I wonder where this sand comes from.” Have you ever hit your ball into the water hazard and thought, “I bet there’s an endless amount of golf balls just sitting at the bottom of that pond?”

Don’t worry! Today’s your lucky day. I have done my research and found some of the most random facts about golf courses, golf balls, golf clubs, and anything else you can think of so next time you’re sitting at the 19th hole, sipping on a few beers with your buddies and one of them jokes, “I wonder where the word ‘caddie’ came from,” you will be armed with the right answer.

And what is that answer? Well, the word “caddie” is derived from the French word “cadet” meaning student. It then became a word used in Scotland meaning “errand boy” and was first used for a boy carrying golf clubs in the mid-1850s.

The Scottish also claim that they invented the game of golf over 500 years ago, however the Chinese claim to have developed a similar game as far back as 943 A.D. Some historians trace the game back to ancient Rome and a game called paganica, a game played with bent sticks meant to hit a leather ball. Originally, golf balls were leather balls stuffed with feathers.

To answer the question about how many golf balls are truly sitting at the bottom at the water hazard will of course vary from pond to pond, but on average around 125,000 balls are hit into the infamous 17th hole at the Stadium Course at Sawgrass per year. According to this article, used golf balls can sell for as much as $1.00 retail, so, really, the bottom of that pond is filled with golf ball gold.

Did you know that all golf balls are different? Each golf ball has between 330 and 500 dimples, depending on the company that makes them. Ideally, a golf ball should have between 380 and 430 dimples for the best overall game.

No matter the number of dimples, a ball will travel farther on a hot day. A golf ball hit at 100mph will travel up to eight yards longer for each increase in temperature of 25 degrees Fahrenheit.

Where does that 100 mph come from? What about your swing speed? Ever wonder how fast you are hitting the ball? The average swing speed of a lady golfer is about 62 mph, that increases to 96 mph for an average LPGA professional. For male golfers, the number is around 84 mph and 108 mph for an average PGA Tour player. Tiger Woods has been clocked at 130 mph.

So what’s the longest drive despite the air temperature? Michael Hoke Austin of Los Angeles recorded a drive of 515 yards — this holds the record for longest drive on an “ordinary course”, whatever that means. Meanwhile, the longest putt ever recorded is an outrageous 375 feet.

Ever hit a hole in one and yell out, “What are the chances?” Well, it’s about 1 in 13,000. And the chances of making two holes-in-one in one round? Well, that’s about 67 million. So either way, if you make a hole in one, drive straight to the convenience store and buy a lottery ticket because the odds are in your favor.

Now, the term ‘hole-in-one’ makes complete sense and I’m sure came about in quite the logical way. However, what about the term ‘birdie’? Apparently, an American named Ab Smith coined the term when playing a round in 1899. He played what he determined to be a “bird of a shot”, which in time has shortened to “birdie”. The term ‘eagle’ came about just shortly after ‘birdie’, which, for American’s, Ab Smith said, would make them think of their country.

Meanwhile, ‘par’ was derived from its use on Wall Street– par figure meant the average, or where the stock usually fell.

I hope this has answered some of your burning questions about the little things involved in golf. Next time you play trivia at the bar with friends, choose the golf category — you’ll be sure to ace it. One last nugget of information — as of 2008, there were 17,652 golf courses in the United States.

Oh, you’re still wondering where the sand comes from? The best sand found in the United States is shipped from all over the country. Rumor has it, it’s tough to find the good stuff on the West Coast. It used to be that any old sand will do, but nowadays, there are several factors that go into choosing the best kind: particle size, color, and even crusting potential. So why even have these sandtraps? Well, there’s this story that sheep in Scotland used to burrow down in the sandy bunkers on the course to avoid the wind. After a while, the bunkers would hollow out, and being so close to the beach, would fill with sand.

But who knows if that’s the truth.

Golf 101: What You Should Know About Handicaps!

January 19th, 2015

Image from Golf North Carolina

The word handicap gets tossed around a lot in the golf world. But for a newbie, it can be a pretty confusing term. But don’t worry, Scratch is here to de-mystify it all! (And for you Rock Head who’ve been golfin’ a while, think of this as a refresher course)

What is a handicap?
A handicap is a number representing a golfer’s potential playing ability on a course. To be official, the United States Golf Teachers Federation (USGTF) defines handicap as “a measure of his current ability over an entire round of golf, signified by a number.” Basically, the lower the number, the better the golfer relative to those with higher numbers. A 2 handicapper is better than a 10 handicapper who is better than a 20 handicapper. Now, take note Rock Heads, that this isn’t simply an average of a golfer’s score, but represents their potential. It signifies how many strokes above or below par a golfer should be able to play. The maximum handicap for a male golfer is 36. For female golfers, this number increases to 40. The number can change over time as a golfer gets better.

How is handicap determined?
Handicaps are based on the difficulty ratings of golf courses that a golfer has played. Not all golf courses are the same difficulty and the handicap equation takes this into consideration. To determine a handicap, a golfer needs to have played a minimum of five rounds but no more than 20 and have those scores cards saved. The course rating and slope rating(these indicate the course difficulty) are also required and both can be found on any score card. The more scores used, the more accurate the handicap.

You can figure out your own handicap online with any number of free handicap calculators such as this one. However, an official handicap – aka a “handicap index” – can only be given by an USGA affiliated club. Do you need an official handicap index? Of course not! However, many tournaments require certain handicaps to enter, and a handicap can only really be proven with an official handicap index card. If you’d like to acquire one, contact your local club!

Why is handicap useful?
The USGA implemented the handicap system in the early 20th century in order to provide a level playing field between golfers of all abilities. It wouldn’t be any fun for a new golfer to play a seasoned pro. Remember when I said that handicap represents a golfer’s potential? By using handicaps, golfers actually compete against each other based on their own expected performance.

For example, say Tom and Mark are playing against each other in stroke play. If Tom has a handicap of 20 and he is playing against Mark with a handicap of 16, Tom would get four strokes over that particular round. That means at the end of the round, Tom would be able to subtract four strokes from his score (because his handicap is four strokes higher than Mark’s), and that would be his total. So if Tom shot a 91 and Mark shot an 89, Tom would win the match by two strokes.

In match play, the overall score the golfer gets for 18 holes does not matter. Each hole is scored, and the golfer who has the lowest score wins each hole. If Mark and Tom are involved in a match play competition and handicaps are being used, Tom would get a stroke from Mark on the four hardest holes on the course. The difficulty of each hole is noted on the scorecard with a “rating” number. Under the rating category, the hardest hole has a rating of 1 and the easiest hole has a rating of 18. So if the 7th hole is 525-yard par 5 and is rated as the No. 1 handicap hole on the course, Tom would get a stroke on the hole. If Tom shot a 7 on that hole and Mark shot a 6, the hole would be “even” because Tom was allowed to subtract a stroke from his score on that hole. He would also be able to subtract a stroke on the No. 2, 3 and 4 handicap holes on the course.

What is course rating?
Not all courses are created equal and a simple handicap does not account for this. Once a handicap index is established, it is then used to determine a course handicap. Course handicap adjusts a golfer’s handicap up or down depending of the difficulty of the course they’re about to play. It tells a golfer how many strokes he is allowed to take on a specific golf course; that is, a course handicap of 14 means the golfer will be able to deduct 14 strokes from his score throughout the round. The calculation is this: Your Handicap Index multiplied by Slope Rating Course divided by 113. So if Tom’s handicap is 20 and he’s playing a course with a slope rating of 127, the formula is 20 x 127/13. The answer to this example is 22.4 meaning Tom’s course handicap is 22. Notice that because the slope of the course in the example is higher that 113(the average course slope rating), Tom gets extra strokes. Tom’s handicap has increased from 20 to a course handicap of 22. Course handicap is useful when playing a new course or one away from home.

Odds and ends

  • If you have more questions about handicaps, go here to About.com for a great FAQ section.
  • Also check out the USGA’s official Handicap System Manuel!
  • By the way did you know that Bubba Watson posts a +7.7 Isleworth Country Club in Florida and Phil Mickleson maintains a +4.6 at Whisper Rock Golf Club in Scottsdale, Arizona?! Check out this Golf.com article to see more handicaps of the Tour Pros!
  • Hope this cleared up any questions you might have had about handicap Rock Heads. Post your handicap in the comments below!

    Enter For A Chance To Win A FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!

    January 16th, 2015

     

    Giveaway Banner

     

    You’ll know what your golf game needs this year? FREE STUFF! And I’m here to help! My Second January Golf Giveaway just started and this time the prize is a gadget that’s sure to help your game and it’s worth over $300! I’m talking about a FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder! So don’t delay Rock Heads  – head on over to Facebook to enter Scratch’s January Golf Giveaway!

     

    Giveaway!Enter to win via Facebook today! Don’t delay – the contest ends at 11:59 pm EST on January 16th!

    • The sweepstakes runs from January 16th to January 31st at 11:59pm, so you can’t procrastinate in entering to win these fabulous prizes.
    • You must be 18+ years old to enter and win. As much as we appreciate you young pups taking an interest in golf, get your parents to enter if you’re not quite reaching that age requirement.
    • The winner has the option of me
    • All entries will be used and drawing will be random.
    • All you have to do is enter your email address. No purchase necessary! If you are chosen as a winner, the email address you submitted will be used to contact you to obtain an address to send the prize.
    • A Facebook account is needed to enter.
    • The winner will be able to choose whether to receive a right handed, left handed, or ladies’ driver.
    • Only people residin’ in countries that we ship to can apply. International winners will get the value of the prize in caveman cash.

     

    The sweepstakes only lasts ’til 11:59pm January 31st, so enter quick for yer chance to win! Enter to win via Facebook today!

     

    Now that that’s are out of the way, let’s take a look at our fabulous prize!

     

    FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!

    The XL1000 is like nothing you’ve seen before from Laser Link Golf. A new design, new features, and new modes add a new dimension to the most complete line of laser rangefinder products in golf. In the hands of the right player, XL1000 is a powerful tool for managing your game.

    Features:

  • Accu Flag Mode – Is it the distance to the flagstick or the distance to the trees behind? Accu Flag technology identifies the closest target to help you get your measurement to the flagstick no matter what is behind the green
  • Size: XL1000 is just large enough to use comfortably, and just compact enough for easy storage. And, at less than 8 ounces, those that love to walk will hardly even know it’s there
  • Scan Mode – Scan the landscape to get multiple readings at the touch of a button
  • 6x Magnification
  • IPX4 Waterproof Design – Do you like to play in the rain? Of course you don’t, but if you have to, do it knowing that your XL1000 will be there to help you play your best
  • Range: 5 – 1000 yards. 5 – 300 yards to flag
  • Measures in yards or meters
  • Measures DISTANCE ONLY so as to conform to USGA and R&A Rules of Golf, as well as USGA Handicap Guidelines.
  • Dimensions: 4.125”x 2.875” x 1.5”
  • Weight (with battery): 7.58 oz.
  • Power Source: CR2 3V Lithium
  • Display: Internal LCD
  • Go to Rock Bottom Golf for more information of the Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!

     

    So don’t delay Rock Heads, go Put Your Name In The Hat for a chance to win a FREE Laser Link XL 1000 Rangefinder!

    The “Who to Watch For Up-and-Comers on The PGA Tour” List

    January 15th, 2015

    2015 PGA Tour Rookies

    Each week the PGA Tour comes out with a list of Rookie Rankings and in the openings days of 2015, it seems golf fans have a plethora of new talent to keep an eye out for. Golfing today resonates with a younger crowd in a way that past generations have never seen. College and junior golf has developed young talent who have made the game “cool” in their own way– like Rickie Fowler’s outfits, or Rory McIlroy’s Twitter presence, or Jordan Spieth’s surge of success last year. We as golf fans have a lot to look forward to in terms of golf talent.

    There are a total of 24 rookies on the PGA Tour this year. To be defined as a “Rookie” a golfer you must play in at least 10 events or finish in the top 125 of the FedEx Cup Rankings. I have compiled a list of names–some of which you’ve already heard of and some who you may not have– of the golfers you need to watch out for in 2015.

    Nick TaylorRanked number one heading into 2015 is Nick Taylor, the only rookie on the tour right now with a victory– The Sanderson Farms Championship. With the win, Taylor, just 26 years old, became the first Canadian to win on The PGA Tour since 2007. His victory came in November, just six months after he got married, and just a month after earning a spot on the tour. Although his win was his only top-ten finish, he finished in the top-25 five times in 2014 on the Web.com Tour.

    The only other rookie to have a top-five finish so far this season is Justin Thomas, who finished T4 at the same event Taylor won. Thomas has people talking, however, after his dominance on the Web.com Tour. He had a win, second, third and 13 overall top-25 finishes, as well as owning the leading birdie average in his Web.com Tour career. Thomas was also the anchor of the 2013 Division I National Championship team at the University of Alabama. During his collegiate career, he held his own against the likes of Jordan Spieth and Patrick Reed, two young pros who have already made their mark on the PGA Tour. Currently, Taylor is ranked as number five in the Rookie Rankings.

    Tony FinauAlready finishing in the top-ten of two events this year, Tony Finau is currently the second ranked rookie on The PGA Tour in 2015 and currently leads with The Tour with 90 birdies. Finau turned pro at age 17, and now at age 25, he is turning heads with his long drive. This season he has twice hit the ball over 370 yards off the tee– he currently ranks 12th in distance off the tee. He had 14 top-25 finishes last year on the Web.com tour, five of those finishing in the top ten.

    Mexican-American golfer, Carlos Ortiz, was named Player of the Year on the Web.com tour last year after three first place finishes and two third place finishes. So far on The PGA Tour, he has finished in the top-ten once and the top-25 two times. He currently stands as the fourth ranked Rookie on The PGA tour this year.

    In case you were wondering who the reigning rookie is, last year’s PGA Tour Rookie of the Year, Chesson Hadley, finished the season bringing in a respectable $1.7 million. His four top-ten finishes on The Tour made an impact and thus far this season he has finished in the top-25 of one of the four tournaments he has played in. He finished the season last year ranked 49th in FedEx Cup standings.

    Of course there are other big name golfers to keep an eye on this season. Tiger Woods’ comeback. Can Rory keep rolling through 2015? Can Bubba repeat at The Masters? Will Billy Horschel take home another FedEx Cup?

    All this golf talk is getting me excited for the spring! When does that pesky groundhog peek out to see his shadow? If he calls for six more weeks of winter, I’m moving south.

    Golf 101: Understanding Frost Delays

    January 12th, 2015

    Original Image From westsussexgolf.co.uk

    So you’ve dragged yourself out of your warm bed at an ungodly hour and drove in your freezing cold car to the course only to find you can’t play because of a “frost delay”. Frost?! You might wonder why you can’t play just because nature has decided to dust the ground with a little bit of chilled water. Well, Rock Heads, Scratch is here to make it all clear.

    It all has to do with potential turf damage. If you see frost on the grass, you should know that it’s a clear sign that the water inside the cells of the blades of grass are frozen. And remember that water is the main part of plant tissue. When the grass is in this state it is extremely fragile and brittle.

    When the grass is like this, any traffic on it could easily damage or kill the grass. Traffic on the turf causes the ice crystals in the cells to puncture through the cell walls, killing the plant tissue. John Hayward, head golf professional at Netley Creek Golf Club, describes it this way, “Think of your arm or leg being frozen solid to the point that it is brittle. It would break off if any pressure was put on it and obviously you would be in trouble. For the grass it simply dies.” This damage can be so severe that if golfers walk on a frost-covered course, by the afternoon you can already see their footprints filled with brown dead grass!

    This picture from Myrtle Beach shows the actual foot print patters of ONE foursome playing the hole like normal. The grass is damaged beyond repair now. Image from northmyrtlebeachgolf.com

    It’s hard to say how long a frost delay will last. It really depends on how soon the sun will be up and how strong it will be. Of course, shady areas will take even longer to “defrost.” So when there is a frost delay, remember to stay off all the grass; different parts of the course will thaw out at different rates.

    Frost delays are annoying, trust me I know. However, your local course superintendent knows the course the best, and we’ve all got to respect their decision. They’ve got to decide between the good of the golfers at the moment and the good of the course long term. My recommendation for enduring a frost delay? Hit the clubhouse for a cup of coffee and take in the early morning beauty of the course.

    The Funniest Golf Memes You’ll Ever See!

    January 8th, 2015

    If you’ve been on the internet at all in the last year or two, you have seen memes. They’re the pictures with often funny white text superimposed on them. They’re extremely popular and apparently here to stay. However, I’ve seen too many examples of them being used incorrectly. It’s like drinking and putting folks, just don’t. So here’s Scratch’s primer to memes with some of my personal favorites. Enjoy Rock Heads!

     

    Bad Luck Brian

    This meme is uses a kids’ awkward yearbook photo to describe a time something started great but ended in embarrassment.

     

    Chemistry Cat

    Use this one if you love science puns!

     

    Condescending Wonka

    The perfect place for patronizing or sarcastic comments.

     

    Not Sure If Fry

    Use this for when your internal monologue is debating two choices.

     

    Success Kid

    For when something goes better than expected

     

    What People Think I Do / What I Really Do

    What the title says. It compares what people think about a job or activity to it’s not as glamorous reality.

     

    Oh, I’m Sorry, I Thought This Was America

    This one comes directly from the character of Randy Marsh on South Park. Use this one as a blanket excuse for your own action in response to criticism. We’ll leave it to you to find the clip from the episode.

     

    The Most Interesting Man In The World

    I’m sure by now, you’ve all seen the Dos Equis commercials about “The Most Interesting Man in the World”. If not, go to YouTube. They always end with  “I don’t always drink beer, but when I do, I prefer Dos Equis” and this meme is just a take off of that. Golfers seem to love this meme and it has even inspired a parody with our favorite Spaniard that we here at the Cave LOVE.

     

     

     

     

    The 2015 Golfer’s Bucket List!

    January 8th, 2015

    Edited. Original source: Kerdowney.com

    Happy New Year! I am sure you have already declared your resolutions for 2015 — and a week in, I’m sure you are sticking to them, right? Since it’s a fresh new year, I decided to make a list of all the things I want to accomplish this year in regards to golf. Call this The Golfer’s 2015 Bucket List. Read it, print it out, keep it somewhere close by. And one by one, cross off the ones that you accomplish over the next 12 months. I’ve incorporated a variety of skill levels from nearly impossible to pretty damn simple, so you should be able to at least get a few of these checked off. Let’s see who can get all 100 done in 2015!

  • 1. Hit a hole in one.
  • 2. Get Tiger Wood’s autograph.
  • 3. Tee off before the sunrise.
  • 4. Golf every day for an entire week.
  • 5. Watch The Masters.
  • 6. Buy a new set of golf clubs.
  • 7 . Donate your old golf equipment.
  • 8. Buy a lucky hat.
  • 9. Wear a mismatched outfit on the course and act like no one is staring.
  • 10. Golf on another continent.
  • 11. Get Rory McIlroy’s autograph.
  • 12. Attend a live PGA tour event.
  • 13. Yell ‘Baba Booey’ out loud after a golfer’s swing.
  • 14. Teach a friend or relative how to play golf.
  • 15. Keep the same ball for the entire year. (And actually use it!)
  • 16. Attend an LPGA tour event in person.
  • 17. Get Michelle Wie’s autograph.
  • 18. Play at least 10 of these courses.
  • 19. Play in a tournament.
  • 20. Shoot an 80 (or under).
  • 21. Shoot a 75 (or under).
  • 22. Hit an eagle.
  • 23. Try to set a World Record involving golf.
  • 24. Play 7 consecutive rounds in one day.
  • 25. Get retweeted by my favorite golf pro.
  • 26. Win a giveaway contest.
  • 27. Play a round in the rain.
  • 28. Play a round in the snow.
  • 29. Drive a ball 300 yards.
  • 30. Get John Daly’s autograph.
  • 31. Take golf lessons.
  • 32. Buy a golf cart for personal use.
  • 33. Decorate a golf cart for a holiday parade.
  • 34. Make a Bubba Claus-esque YouTube video.
  • 35. Buy a pair of golf knickers.
  • 36. Play a round in said golf knickers.
  • 37. Watch the US Open.
  • 38. Attend a live event. DVR it. And find yourself on TV when you watch it back.
  • 39. Date a golfer.
  • 40. Use a golf club for something other than golfing.
  • 41. Hit a birdie.
  • 42. Finish at par.
  • 43. Call into a sports radio show to talk golf.
  • 44. Use a golf ball for something other than golf.
  • 45. Attend an event at a country club.
  • 46. Become a member at a country club.
  • 47. Frame a piece of golf paraphernalia.
  • 48. Bid on a golf item on Ebay.
  • 49. Go to a golf trade show.
  • 50. Buy something at a golf trade show.
  • 51. Play golf in a state not adjacent to my home state.
  • 52. Play a round of golf with someone I’ve never played with before.
  • 53. Meet a famous golfer.
  • 54. Play golf in a country that does not speak English.
  • 55. Play a course backwards.
  • 56. Play only the even numbered holes during a game of golf.
  • 57. Play only the odd numbered holes during a game of golf.
  • 58. Go diving for golf balls.
  • 59. Go skinny dipping in a golf course pond.
  • 60. Make a sand angel in a sand trap.
  • 61. Play putt-putt.
  • 62. Go on a date to a golf course/driving range/putt-putt course.
  • 63. Play a hole blindfolded.
  • 64. Play a round in your bathing suit.
  • 65. Run through the sprinklers on the green.
  • 66. Sponsor a hole at your country club.
  • 67. Throw a golf-themed party.
  • 68. Use a golf ball as a cake topper.
  • 69. See the mountains while golfing.
  • 70. See the ocean while golfing.
  • 71. Travel on an airplane with my golf clubs.
  • 72. Watch Caddyshack.
  • 73. Livestream a golf event at work on your computer.
  • 74. Play in a charity tournament.
  • 75. Donate money in said charity tournament.
  • 76. Learn to swing left-handed (or right-handed, for all of you lefties).
  • 77. Learn to ‘dribble’ with you golf club and golf ball.
  • 78. Play a round without shoes.
  • 79. Wear an umbrella hat to the course.
  • 80. Follow one golfer to every hole at a PGA event.
  • 81. Drive a golf ball into the ocean.
  • 82. Establish a handicap.
  • 83. Hit the ball into the hole without a putter.
  • 84. Buy an instructional DVD.
  • 85. Get 4 sand saves in one round.
  • 86. Watch the PGA Championship.
  • 87. Get a sunburn while playing golf.
  • 88. Make a bet on a game of golf.
  • 89. Win said bet.
  • 90. Watch The Open Championship.
  • 91. Get Phil Mickelson’s autograph.
  • 92. Tee off from the farthest tee.
  • 93. Play the ball where it lies… on a rock, in water, in the trees, etc.
  • 94. Get a golf-inspired tattoo (no one said it had to be permanent).
  • 95. Yell “FORE!” and actually mean it.
  • 96. Finish off a game of golf with a cigar and a beer.
  • 97. Keep a scorecard for every game you play this year.
  • 98. Try on a Master’s Green Jacket.
  • 99. Watch an epic sunset from the course.
  • 100. Continue to dream and work toward qualifying for a major tournament!
  • So there it is! What are you waiting for? Get golfing!